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Teaching and Learning

This category contains 206 posts

Eureka! Teaching for creativity. C = f (K, P, D)

  Over the years I’ve thought a lot about the question of teaching for creativity.  Back in 2012 I wrote this post where I made some reasonably sensible general statements: It is uncontroversial that for us to solve Humanity’s problems, to create the conditions for a sustainable future and also to maximise the cultural richness of … Continue reading

Vietnam, Ali, reading and the powerful knowledge gap.

In a recent lesson observation, I witnessed a classic teacher-dilemma unfold.   How far do I have to go to fill in the knowledge gaps? I can’t teach them everything they don’t know so where do I begin? It was in a GCSE English resit class where students were looking at a reading comprehension question.  Here’s … Continue reading

Rescuing Differentiation from the Checklist of Bad Practice.

I’m not exactly sure why but it feels like, as a profession, we’ve made a mess of the concepts and language that apply to the everyday processes needed to teach a wide range of students within one class.  A range of what? Attainment, ability, experience, competence, knowledge, skill, confidence, fluency? Most likely a mix of … Continue reading

Teaching for Distinction, the Oldham College #CPDinFE programme is working!

This week, the news was released that Oldham College received a strongly positive inspection outcome:  The press report here, tells the story:   After an intensive four-day inspection with a large team, the College was judged ‘Good’ in all categories – many more than apply to a school.  This is such great news.  As anyone … Continue reading

Curriculum Maps: Knowing New York; Knowing about New York.

This posts builds on the last one:  Mapping curriculum terrain: The beaten track and beyond, using  geographical metaphors to consider curriculum design issues. New York. A Case Study.  Let’s imagine, in the metaphor, that New York City represents an area of the curriculum.  Our goal is for students to learn about New York and we need … Continue reading

Mapping curriculum terrain: The beaten track and beyond.

When school leaders and teachers start reviewing their curriculum, there are so many complex considerations.  What to teach and why?  It’s a huge question. At the macro, big picture scale, there’s a need to consider overarching principles and values – because these ideas inform or dictate the decisions that are taken.  Which subjects to teach and … Continue reading

Revisiting Dylan Wiliam’s Five Brilliant Formative Assessment Strategies.

In many of Dylan Wiliam’s talks and publications he references five ‘key strategies’ that support the implementation of effective formative assessment.  The five strategies each get a chapter in his excellent book Embedding Formative Assessment (2011)  which builds on the work he developed with other colleagues in the 90s and 00s. The five strategies were … Continue reading

The @teacherhead planning tool. Draft

I’m trying to design something that might be helpful for teachers planning lessons.  I have drafted two tools, one a structured reflection sheet for thinking through what is needed for a detailed unit of work; the other a very simple short-hand version for scoping out a series of lessons. In both cases, the idea is … Continue reading

12 Golden Gifts from the Edusphere in 2018

Happy Holidays!! Whoop.  Everyone deserves a mighty rest….  But what a year it’s been!!  I feel the profession is brimming with genius at the moment and, thanks to conference events and social media, the sharing culture is just superb.  I’ve learned so much… Here are 12 golden gifts from this year… books, ideas, people, blogs, … Continue reading

The Roots of Rosenshine’s Principles.

I’m excited to say that I am in the process of writing a short book explaining how to implement Rosenshine’s Principles of instruction, aimed at teachers in the US.  The opportunity to do this came about after one of my ResearchEd talks about Rosenshine’s 2012 American Educator article – as explored in this post. What … Continue reading

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